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Frequently Asked Questions.

Symproic Savings Card

  • Does the card need to be activated?

    • The Symproic Savings Card requires activation before it can be used. The card can be activated by calling 844-231-2396.

  • Are there any restrictions on using the Symproic Savings Card?

    • This card cannot be used if your prescriptions are covered by:

    • Any federal or state healthcare program, including a state medical or pharmaceutical assistance program (Medicare, Medicaid, Medigap, VA, DOD, TRICARE, etc.)

    • Medicare's Prescription Drug Program (Part D Program); or

    • Insurance in states that have an “all payor” anti-kickback law or insurance that is paying the entire cost of the prescription.

    • Cash-paying patients are not eligible. Click here to review all Terms and Conditions, and Eligibility Requirements.

  • How much does Symproic cost?

    • The cost of Symproic varies based on insurance and pharmacy. It is best to check with your insurance provider and pharmacy to determine the cost.

  • Will my insurance cover Symproic?

    • Every insurance plan is different. It is recommended that you check with your insurance plan to determine coverage.

About Symproic

  • What is Symproic?

    • Symproic is a prescription medicine used to treat constipation that is caused by prescription pain medicines called opioids in adults with long-lasting (chronic) pain that is not caused by active cancer. It is not known if Symproic is safe and effective in children.

  • What symptoms does Symproic intend to treat?

    • Clinical studies in patients with chronic non-cancer pain have shown Symproic® (naldemedine) can help with OIC symptoms. Symproic may help you go more*:

    • Often—Bowel movements that occur more frequently

    • Completely—Bowel movements that feel complete

    • Without straining—Bowel movements that are easier to pass

    • *Individual results may vary. Results from clinical studies compared with placebo (sugar pill).

  • How does it work?

    • Symproic works by helping to address the cause of OIC. It blocks the effects of opioids in your gut, giving your bowel a chance to work.

  • What are the most common side effects of Symproic?

    • The most common side effects of Symproic include stomach (abdomen) pain, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting (gastroenteritis).

      Symproic may cause serious side effects, including:

    • Tear in your stomach or intestinal wall (perforation). Stomach pain that is severe can be a sign of a serious medical condition. If you get stomach pain that does not go away, stop taking Symproic and get emergency medical help right away.

    • Opioid withdrawal. You may have symptoms of opioid withdrawal during treatment with Symproic including sweating, chills, tearing, warm or hot feeling to your face (flush), sneezing, fever, feeling cold, abdominal pain, diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting. Tell your healthcare provider if you have any of these symptoms.

    • Tell your healthcare provider if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away. These are not all the possible side effects of Symproic. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What is Symproic?

Symproic® (naldemedine) is a prescription medicine used to treat constipation that is caused by prescription pain medicines called opioids, in adults with long-lasting (chronic) pain that is not caused by active cancer.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Symproic may cause serious side effects, including:

  • Tear in your stomach or intestinal wall (perforation). Stomach pain that is severe can be a sign of a serious medical condition. If you get stomach pain that does not go away, stop taking Symproic and get emergency medical help right away.
  • Opioid withdrawal. You may have symptoms of opioid withdrawal during treatment with Symproic including sweating, chills, tearing, warm or hot feeling to your face (flush), sneezing, fever, feeling cold, abdominal pain, diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting. Tell your healthcare provider if you have any of these symptoms.

Do not take Symproic if you:

  • Have a bowel blockage (intestinal obstruction) or have a history of bowel blockage.
  • Are allergic to Symproic or any of the ingredients in Symproic. Tell your healthcare provider or pharmacist before you start or stop any medicines during treatment with Symproic.

Before you take Symproic, tell your healthcare provider about all your medical conditions, including if you:

  • Have any stomach or bowel (intestines) problems, including stomach ulcer, Crohn’s disease, diverticulitis, cancer of the stomach or bowel, or Ogilvie’s syndrome.
  • Have liver problems.
  • Are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. Taking Symproic during pregnancy may cause opioid withdrawal symptoms in your unborn baby. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you become pregnant during treatment with Symproic.
  • Are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known if Symproic passes into breast milk. Taking Symproic while you are breastfeeding may cause opioid withdrawal in your baby. You should not breastfeed during treatment with Symproic and for 3 days after your last dose. You and your healthcare provider should decide if you will take Symproic or breastfeed. You should not do both.

Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Certain medicines may affect the way Symproic works.

If you stop taking your opioid pain medicine, stop taking Symproic and tell your healthcare provider.

The most common side effects of Symproic include: stomach (abdomen) pain, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting (gastroenteritis).

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Please see Full Prescribing Information and Medication Guide for Symproic.